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Robert Parker Scores and Misses

robert parker“I want to see all of you succeed,” Robert M. Parker Jr. told more than 40 wine writers in attendance at last week’s Symposium for Professional Wine Writers at Meadowood in St. Helena. This was a generous, perhaps surprising, statement from Parker who has frequently— and very recently—traded criticism and low blows with many of the same scribes. I’m convinced he meant every word, the denunciations and the well-wishes.

Robert Parker is full of contradictions, as are we all. But unlike the things you and I say, his every sentence is scrutinized, canonized and simultaneously chastised. He has long been the emperor of wine criticism. He remains so, though the power of that empire declines due to democratization of wine commentary and a recent secession.

As sound bites from Parker’s semi-extemporaneous talk were tweeted and retweeted, Facebooked and “liked,” outside observers responded instantly. “Words to live by!” said one. Parker’s statements resonated with many. But others called him “delusional” and “disingenous.” It’s lonely at the top.

Speaking of which, there were poignant moments. “I was extremely lucky,” said Parker, “I wish you all the success I’ve had. And the climb to the top is what makes it all worthwhile. Once you get there, there’s nothing there.” He’s been “there” for 30 years.

Robert Parker set out to be a consumer advocate. Ralph Nader was his inspiration. The clear conflicts of interest inherent with top British wine writers’ also selling wine were his call to action. He set out to create a newsletter with unassailably independent reviews. Parker’s identification of 1982 as a Bordeaux vintage for the ages, in stark disagreement with many critics, brought international prominence that he built upon for the three decades to follow.

Along the way he made and buried wineries. He can’t see that. Producers’ desire to rate highly in his newsletter drove richness in wine, and eventually alcohol, to unprecedented levels. He won’t admit that. He simply said, “I do believe flavor intensity is critical. And I am looking for wines that will develop in five to ten years. Some of the thin, feminine, elegant wines being praised today will fall apart. You need some richness and intensity for development.” Then there were popping sounds as some writers’ heads exploded.

Parker spoke for roughly half-an-hour and took questions for another 30 minutes. Listening was a privilege and a frustration. I was grateful for the opportunity, regretful he didn’t stay longer. Dozens of questions went unasked, as many conflicts unresolved. But Robert Parker did offer valuable insights. Later this week I’ll share them, along with comments from some other writers in attendance.

In the meantime, please enjoy this beautiful video montage of the symposium created by Kaethy and Tim Kennedy of Story Cellars.

 

Follow NorCalWine on Twitter for wine news, information on events and more, or friend me on Facebook. This article is original to NorCalWine.com. Copyright 2014. Photo of Robert Parker from erobertparker.com.  All rights reserved.